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FAQ'S! 

HEADSHOTS

 

What Type of Headshot Background Is Right For Me?

Is there a certain style that’s uniform in my industry?

For some industries, like law, medicine and finance, solid-colored studio backdrops are pretty much the standard across the field. So, unless you’re aiming to be a maverick, you should probably stick with a traditional studio session.

In other industries, there’s no standard format, so go with whatever backdrop suits you! The safest bet, though, is almost always a studio backdrop.

In case you’re curious, here is a non-exhaustive list of customary backdrops based on industry:

 

Law: Dark Gray or In-Office

Real Estate: On-Site at Listing

Medicine: White Studio Backdrop

Pharmaceutical/Biomedical: In-Office or Outdoor

Finance: White Studio, Gray Studio, or Black Studio Backdrop

Large Corporation: Medium-Tone Gray Studio Backdrop

Technology: In-Office, Outdoor, or Studio (Varies)

Marketing Agency: Outdoor

Construction: Outdoor

Consulting: Studio Backdrop 

Fashion: Urban Outdoor

Dating: Various Outdoor

Freelance/Solo-Entrepreneur: Any

Energy: White or Off-White Studio Backdrop 

Architecture: White or Off-White Studio Backdrop

Acting/Modeling: Any Color Studio Backdrop

Musicians: Any Color Studio Backdrop

At Toros Photography any background can be applied in a studio photo shoot! 

What do I want my personal brand to be in this industry?

When deciding on your backdrop, there’s a bit of a balancing act between being approachable and being professional.

In general, studio sessions appear more “intentional” and therefore more professional.

In general, outdoor/in-office sessions appear more “candid,” which can come off as more friendly.

There are pros and cons to both styles. Unless your boss/employer is enforcing a specific backdrop style, feel free to either a) buck the trend and pick the opposite of what’s standard for your industry (be a maverick!) or b) just go for an impeccably executed version of that standard style.

 

Realistically, are there any personal photography-related limitations that I might have?

Everyone has their own special circumstances. You should also consider the following personal questions.

  1. Is my hair long? Beware of shooting outdoors, particularly in the afternoon. Your hair will be everywhere, bellowing like Fabio’s in the wind. 

  2. Am I sensitive to flash photography? Certain people with epilepsy or other related health issues should go with an outdoor shoot, as it won’t involve any sudden bursts of light.

  3. Am I sensitive to continuous lighting? On the flip side, some people’s eyes are sensitive to continuous light, forcing them to squint during bright photography sessions. In this case, go for a studio session that uses flash photography. (Hint: People with light-colored eyes typically have this problem. If you have brown/black eyes, you’re probably OK either way.)

  4. How photogenic do I personally think I am? If you’re concerned about whether or not you are photogenic, outdoor and in-office settings are generally more forgiving. 

 

Will I feel more comfortable in a certain setting?

If you just know you’re going to feel more comfortable outdoors, then go for it! If you know you’ll feel more professional in a studio, then go with that!

Unless your employer is forcing you to get a headshot with a specific format, you should pick whichever session “feels right” for your circumstances. It’ll result in a more natural posture and expression, and a better final photo.

 

FAMILY SESSION

WHAT TO WEAR – DRESSING YOUR FAMILY FOR PHOTOS

When shooting family photography, the way all the outfits and accessories of each family member are in harmony will genuinely be the icing on the cake and pull everything together. Make sure to follow these tips to get the best out of your family photo session:

 

CHOOSE YOUR PALETTE FIRST.

For starter, pick a few colors. Go above and beyond and try to use different tones, like blue, earth, neutrals, pastels, and so on. That way, it’ll be much easier for the whole family to express their own style, but within the chosen color palette. The end result is that the whole group will coordinate beautifully.

COORDINATE YOUR COLORS INSTEAD OF MATCHING

Pick a color combination for your family to work within. We don’t want everyone to match perfectly or wear nothing but a single color, but we also don’t want everyone to wear different colors and patterns.

CHOOSE NEUTRAL CLOTHING.

When having no idea what colors to wear for photos, wearing any combination of cream, gray, and tan, always looks good in almost every setting. Those softer, neutral colors provide more focus for the people posing in the photos.

BUY CLOTHES TOGETHER

Preparing for a family portrait session is much easier when the whole family is shopping together at the same store or brand. This is a great thing especially for the families with two or more children. Some of my favorite places for clothes are H&M, Old Navy, Roots, Winners, GAP, Hudson's Bay, Costco, Wal-mart, Amazon, etc.

ADD A POP OF COLOR

Don’t be afraid to sport your favorite color!

Pick a few happy colors (one or two) and then balance them with some neutral details.

WATCH THE SHOES

Picking clothes is great, but don’t forget the shoes. Nothing kills a great photo like a bad pair of shoes.

 

BRING ACCESSORIES

Accessories give photos a new dimension. They can pop out with their color, they express your personality and wake interest. Use hats, flowers, bows, suspenders, vests.

MAKE SURE YOUR CLOTHING WILL NOT BLEND IN WITH YOUR BACKGROUND

Are you going for a photo session in the woods? Try to limit greens in your clothing.

I ask all my clients to send me pictures of their outfits before the session. This way, I can coordinate blankets, props, and even locations based on your clothing choices. I’m also happy to help you advise you on what to wear. 

TRY BRINGING SOME PROPS FOR CHILDREN

Think what could make for a nice prop to play around during the session. Interaction with an item will help loosen them up and make the session more enjoyable.

 

HAVE FUN

Finally, the greatest thing you can bring to a family photography session is a great attitude. It sounds like a cliché alright, but that’s the secret sauce of every great photo. A hearty and honest smile makes every photo looks better, especially with the whole family in it.

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